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J Gen Virol. 2014 Nov;95(Pt 11):2329-45. doi: 10.1099/vir.0.068270-0. Epub 2014 Jul 7.

Laboratory animal models to study foot-and-mouth disease: a review with emphasis on natural and vaccine-induced immunity.

Author information

1
The Pirbright Institute, Ash Road, Woking, Surrey GU24 0NF, UK Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ES, UK.
2
The Pirbright Institute, Ash Road, Woking, Surrey GU24 0NF, UK.
3
Department of Pathology and Infectious Diseases, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7TE, UK.
4
Department of Veterinary Medicine, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0ES, UK.
5
The Pirbright Institute, Ash Road, Woking, Surrey GU24 0NF, UK nicholas.juleff@pirbright.ac.uk.

Abstract

Laboratory animal models have provided valuable insight into foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) pathogenesis in epidemiologically important target species. While not perfect, these models have delivered an accelerated time frame to characterize the immune responses in natural hosts and a platform to evaluate therapeutics and vaccine candidates at a reduced cost. Further expansion of these models in mice has allowed access to genetic mutations not available for target species, providing a powerful and versatile experimental system to interrogate the immune response to FMDV and to target more expensive studies in natural hosts. The purpose of this review is to describe commonly used FMDV infection models in laboratory animals and to cite examples of when these models have failed or successfully provided insight relevant for target species, with an emphasis on natural and vaccine-induced immunity.

PMID:
25000962
PMCID:
PMC4202264
DOI:
10.1099/vir.0.068270-0
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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