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Public Health. 2014 Jul;128(7):643-6. doi: 10.1016/j.puhe.2014.05.004. Epub 2014 Jul 4.

Parental factors in children's active transport to school.

Author information

1
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA. Electronic address: hmhenne@uw.edu.
2
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA. Electronic address: pooja@uw.edu.
3
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada. Electronic address: lawrence.frank@ubc.ca.
4
University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA; Seattle Children's Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA. Electronic address: brian.saelens@seattlechildrens.org.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Identify non-distance factors related to children's active transport (AT) to school, including parental, home, and environment characteristics. Understanding the factors related to children's AT to school, beyond distance to school, could inform interventions to increase AT and children's overall physical activity.

STUDY DESIGN:

Participants were in the Neighborhood Impact on Kids Study, a longitudinal, observational cohort study of children aged 6-11 and their parents in King County, WA and San Diego County, CA between 2007 and 2009. Parents reported frequency and mode of child transport to school, perceived neighbourhood, home and family environments, parental travel behaviours, and sociodemographics.

METHODS:

Children living less than a 20 minute walk to school were in this analysis. Children classified as active transporters (walked/bicycled to or from school at least once per week) were compared with those not using AT as often.

RESULTS:

Children using AT were older and had parents who reported themselves using active transport. Having a family rule that restricts the child to stay within sight of the parent or home and more parent working hours were related to lower odds of a child using AT.

CONCLUSIONS:

Children's AT to school is associated with parental AT to work and other locations. Interventions should be considered that enable whole family AT, ameliorate safety concerns and decrease the need for parental supervision, such as walking school buses.

KEYWORDS:

Childhood obesity; Family; Physical activity; Walking school bus

PMID:
24999161
PMCID:
PMC4149318
DOI:
10.1016/j.puhe.2014.05.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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