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Ocul Surf. 2014 Jul;12(3):215-20. doi: 10.1016/j.jtos.2014.02.005. Epub 2014 Apr 15.

Sialography of the transplanted submandibular gland.

Author information

1
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing, P. R. China.
2
Department of Oral Radiology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing, P. R. China.
3
Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing, P. R. China. Electronic address: gyyu@263.net.

Abstract

Autologous transplantation of submandibular gland (SMG) is effective for severe keratoconjunctivitis sicca (KCS). Sialography is a method for morphological evaluation of the transplanted gland.We recruited 15 patients (15 eyes) with severe KCS who had successfully undergone SMG transplantation. Thirteen patients had normal transplanted SMGs, while two patients were suspected to have obstructive sialadenitis of the transplanted SMG. Sialography was performed in each patient with meglumine diatrizoate. Projections were applied immediately and 5, 7, and 10 min after contrast injection. The median dose of the contrast medium was 0.9 ml (range, 0.7-1.1 ml) for the full-size transplanted SMGs and 0.5 ml for the glands after reduction surgery. The acini and the ducts were clearly visible on sialograms. The contrast medium was completely excreted in 10 min in normal transplanted SMGs. The main duct had a regular shape in normal transplanted SMGs, while irregular dilation and stricture of the duct with delayed excretion of the contrast medium were found in the glands with obstructive sialadenitis. In conclusion, sialography is clinically feasible and valuable for the morphological evaluation of the transplanted SMG.

KEYWORDS:

keratoconjunctivitis sicca; morphology; sialadenitis; sialography; submandibular gland; transplantation

PMID:
24999103
DOI:
10.1016/j.jtos.2014.02.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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