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Cell Metab. 2014 Aug 5;20(2):368-375. doi: 10.1016/j.cmet.2014.06.003. Epub 2014 Jul 3.

Bone marrow adipose tissue is an endocrine organ that contributes to increased circulating adiponectin during caloric restriction.

Author information

1
Department of Molecular & Integrative Physiology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.
2
Musculoskeletal Research, Lilly Research Laboratories, Indianapolis, Indiana, 46285, USA.
3
Program in Cell and Molecular Biology, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.
4
College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, 712100, People's Republic of China.
5
Department of Pediatrics and Communicable Diseases, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.
6
Center for Arrhythmia Research (Department of Internal Medicine - Cardiology), University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.
7
Department of Vascular Surgery, University of Michigan Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.
8
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Michigan Hospital, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.
9
Masonic Cancer Center and Therapeutic Radiology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA.
10
Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.
11
Neuroendocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, 02114, USA.
12
Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, 06519, USA.
13
Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Scarborough, ME, 04074, USA.
14
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, USA.
#
Contributed equally

Abstract

The adipocyte-derived hormone adiponectin promotes metabolic and cardiovascular health. Circulating adiponectin increases in lean states such as caloric restriction (CR), but the reasons for this paradox remain unclear. Unlike white adipose tissue (WAT), bone marrow adipose tissue (MAT) increases during CR, and both MAT and serum adiponectin increase in many other clinical conditions. Thus, we investigated whether MAT contributes to circulating adiponectin. We find that adiponectin secretion is greater from MAT than WAT. Notably, specific inhibition of MAT formation in mice results in decreased circulating adiponectin during CR despite unaltered adiponectin expression in WAT. Inhibiting MAT formation also alters skeletal muscle adaptation to CR, suggesting that MAT exerts systemic effects. Finally, we reveal that both MAT and serum adiponectin increase during cancer therapy in humans. These observations identify MAT as an endocrine organ that contributes significantly to increased serum adiponectin during CR and perhaps in other adverse states.

PMID:
24998914
PMCID:
PMC4126847
DOI:
10.1016/j.cmet.2014.06.003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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