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J Clin Neurosci. 2014 Oct;21(10):1705-8. doi: 10.1016/j.jocn.2014.03.015. Epub 2014 Jul 4.

CR1 is potentially associated with rate of decline in sporadic Alzheimer's disease.

Author information

1
Department of Neurology, Clinical Dementia Center, Georg August University Medical Center, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, 37075 Goettingen, Germany. Electronic address: cschmid2@gwdg.de.
2
Department of Neurology, Clinical Dementia Center, Georg August University Medical Center, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, 37075 Goettingen, Germany.
3
Department of Clinical Chemistry, Georg August University Medical Center, Goettingen, Germany.
4
Department of Statistics and Bioinformatics, Georg August University Medical Center, Goettingen, Germany.
5
Department of Neurology, Clinical Dementia Center, Georg August University Medical Center, Robert-Koch-Str. 40, 37075 Goettingen, Germany; DZNE - German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, Germany.

Abstract

The objective of this study was to investigate potential associations of Alzheimer's disease risk single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with disease progression. SNP in ACE, ApoE, BIN1, CLU, CR1, CST3, EXOC3L2, GWA14q32.13, IL8, LDLR, PICALM, and TNK1 were determined in 40 Alzheimer's disease patients who were observed for 2 to 3 years. Annual Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) loss was used as the outcome parameter in multiple regression analyses. Regarding a CR1 SNP (rs3818361) G-allele carriers featured faster declines (approximately 3 MMSE points per year). To summarize, in addition to being a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease development, a CR1 SNP appears to be associated with higher rates of medium-term disease progression. Therefore, it may serve as a prognostic marker (among others) and may aid in differentiating slow from fast progressors early in the disease course.

KEYWORDS:

Alzheimer; CR1; Polymorphism; Progression; SNP

PMID:
24998857
DOI:
10.1016/j.jocn.2014.03.015
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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