Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Chemosphere. 2014 Sep;111:327-35. doi: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2014.03.129. Epub 2014 May 13.

Occurrence, seasonal variation and risk assessment of antibiotics in the reservoirs in North China.

Author information

1
Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Tianjin University, Wei Jin Road 92, Tianjin 300072, China. Electronic address: linan0365@126.com.
2
Department of Environmental and Municipal Engineering, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Aquatic Science and Technology, Tianjin Chengjian University, Jinjing Road 26, Tianjin 300384, China.
3
Tianjin Sino French Jieyuan Water Company Limited, Jieyuan Road 30, Tianjin 300121, China.
4
Department of Environmental Sciences and Engineering, Tianjin University, Wei Jin Road 92, Tianjin 300072, China.

Abstract

The occurrence and seasonal variability of five groups (tetracycline, quinolone, chloramphenicol, macrolide and sulfonamide) of antibiotics were investigated in the surface water of four reservoirs. The dissolved concentrations of 29 antibiotics were in the ngL(-1) level. Trace levels of all target antibiotics were analyzed using solid-phase extraction followed by liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. All of the antibiotics were detected at all sampling sites, indicating widespread occurrence of antibiotics in the study area. The detection of florfenicol, josamycin, kitasamycin, spiramycin and sulfameter is the first report of these compounds in reservoir samples. The results showed an association between the presence of some antibiotics at Panjiakou reservoir and cage culture of fish. Twenty-three types of antibiotics showed significant seasonal variations (p<0.001) due to human activities and flow conditions. A risk assessment showed that all antibiotics detected could cause very low risk to algae, daphnid and fish. Further health risk need to be investigated because these reservoirs are drinking water sources.

KEYWORDS:

Antibiotic; Reservoir; Risk assessment; Seasonal variation

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center