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Res Vet Sci. 2014 Oct;97(2):274-81. doi: 10.1016/j.rvsc.2014.06.008. Epub 2014 Jun 13.

Aflatoxicosis chemoprevention by probiotic Lactobacillius and lack of effect on the major histocompatibility complex.

Author information

1
Graduate Toxicology Program, and Department of Animal, Dairy and Veterinary Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322, USA.
2
Department of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN 55108, USA.
3
School of Biological Sciences, University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.
4
Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322, USA.
5
Graduate Toxicology Program, and Department of Animal, Dairy and Veterinary Sciences, Utah State University, Logan, UT 84322, USA. Electronic address: roger@usu.edu.

Abstract

Turkeys are extremely sensitive to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) which causes decreased growth, immunosuppression and liver necrosis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether probiotic Lactobacillus, shown to be protective in animal and clinical studies, would likewise confer protection in turkeys, which were treated for 11 days with either AFB1 (AFB; 1 ppm in diet), probiotic (PB; 1 × 10(11) CFU/ml; oral, daily), probiotic + AFB1 (PBAFB), or PBS control (CNTL). The AFB1 induced drop in body and liver weights were restored to normal in CNTL and PBAFB groups. Hepatotoxicity markers were not significantly reduced by probiotic treatment. Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes BG1 and BG4, which are differentially expressed in liver and spleens, were not significantly affected by treatments. These data indicate modest protection, but the relatively high dietary AFB1 treatment, and the extreme sensitivity of this species may reveal limits of probiotic-based protection strategies.

KEYWORDS:

Aflatoxin; BG; Chemoprevention; Gene expression; MHC; Poultry; Probiotics; Toxicology; Turkeys

PMID:
24997556
DOI:
10.1016/j.rvsc.2014.06.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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