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Appetite. 2014 Oct;81:305-11. doi: 10.1016/j.appet.2014.06.103. Epub 2014 Jul 1.

Effects of exposure to television advertising for energy-dense/nutrient-poor food on children's food intake and obesity in South Korea.

Author information

1
Department of Foods and Nutrition, Kookmin University, 77 Jeongneung-ro, Seungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702, South Korea.
2
Department of Advertising and Public Relations, Dongguk University, 30 Pildong-ro 1-gil, Jung-gu, Seoul 100-175, South Korea.
3
Department of Food and Nutrition, Inha University, 100 Inharo, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751, South Korea.
4
Department of Food and Nutrition, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-742, South Korea.
5
Department of Foods and Nutrition, Kookmin University, 77 Jeongneung-ro, Seungbuk-gu, Seoul 136-702, South Korea. Electronic address: schung@kookmin.ac.kr.

Abstract

The aim of this study was to determine the effect of television food advertising on participant food intake and risk of obesity. A total of 2419 children aged 11-13 years were selected from 118 elementary schools in South Korea. All participants completed a self-administered questionnaire with questions about height, weight, television viewing times, food preferences, and food intakes. To estimate actual exposure to food advertising, we asked participants to specify the times at which they usually watched television. We then collected data on the various types of food advertisement broadcast on five different television networks during those viewing times over the course of the previous 7 months. The amount of television watched and exposure to energy-dense/nutrient-poor (EDNP) food advertising were associated with an increased risk of being overweight or obese. Exposure to television advertising for EDNP food was also significantly associated with higher EDNP food preference and intake and lower fruit and vegetable intake. However, these relationships disappeared for all foods after adjusting for the overall amount of television watched. Although it was not possible to conclude that exposure to television advertising for EDNP food was associated with an increased risk of obesity, preference for EDNP foods, or overall food intake due to the strong comprehensive effects of television viewing time, there was a reason to believe the evidence of the effects of advertising in this study. Future longitudinal studies are needed to determine the exclusive effects of exposure to television advertising for EDNP food.

KEYWORDS:

Children; Energy-dense/nutrient-poor food; Food intake; Obesity; Preference; TV advertising

PMID:
24996594
DOI:
10.1016/j.appet.2014.06.103
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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