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Food Chem. 2014 Dec 1;164:462-9. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.05.041. Epub 2014 May 20.

Total antioxidant capacity and starch digestibility of muffins baked with rice, wheat, oat, corn and barley flour.

Author information

1
Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, 14 Medical Drive, #07-02, Singapore 117599, Singapore. Electronic address: soong_yean_yean@sics.a-star.edu.sg.
2
Food Science & Technology Programme, Department of Chemistry, S14 Level 5, Science Drive 2, Singapore 117542, Singapore.
3
Clinical Nutrition Research Centre, Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, 14 Medical Drive, #07-02, Singapore 117599, Singapore.

Abstract

Muffins are a popular snack consumed in western and emerging countries. Increased glycemic load has been implicated in the aetiology of diabetes. This study examined the starch digestibility of muffins baked with rice, wheat, corn, oat and barley flour. Rapidly digested starch (RDS) was greatest in rice (445 mg/g) and wheat (444 mg/g) muffins, followed by oat (416 mg/g), corn (402 mg/g) and barley (387 mg/g). Total phenolic content was found to be positively correlated with total antioxidative capacity and inversely related to the RDS of muffins. The phenolic content was highest in muffin baked with barley flour (1,687 μg/g), followed by corn (1,454 μg/g), oat (945 μg/g), wheat (705 μg/g), and rice (675 μg/g) flour. Browning was shown not to correlate with free radical scavenging capacity and digestibility of muffins. The presence of high phenolic content and low RDS makes barley muffin an ideal snack to modulate glycemic response.

KEYWORDS:

Browning; Maillard reaction products; Phenolic; Rapidly digested starch; Slowly digested starch

PMID:
24996358
DOI:
10.1016/j.foodchem.2014.05.041
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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