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Semin Pediatr Surg. 2014 Jun;23(3):112-8. doi: 10.1053/j.sempedsurg.2014.06.010. Epub 2014 Jun 5.

Biomaterials for tissue engineering applications.

Author information

1
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Bridgeside Point 2, 450 Technology Drive, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219; Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
2
McGowan Institute for Regenerative Medicine, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Bridgeside Point 2, 450 Technology Drive, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219; Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Electronic address: badylaksf@upmc.edu.

Abstract

With advancements in biological and engineering sciences, the definition of an ideal biomaterial has evolved over the past 50 years from a substance that is inert to one that has select bioinductive properties and integrates well with adjacent host tissue. Biomaterials are a fundamental component of tissue engineering, which aims to replace diseased, damaged, or missing tissue with reconstructed functional tissue. Most biomaterials are less than satisfactory for pediatric patients because the scaffold must adapt to the growth and development of the surrounding tissues and organs over time. The pediatric community, therefore, provides a distinct challenge for the tissue engineering community.

KEYWORDS:

Bioactive molecules; Biomaterials; Tissue engineering

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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