Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Med Clin North Am. 2014 Jul;98(4):833-49, xiii. doi: 10.1016/j.mcna.2014.04.002.

Elbow tendinopathy.

Author information

1
Penn State Sports Medicine, Penn State University, State College, 1850 East Park Avenue, Suite 112, State College, PA 16803, USA.
2
Penn State Sports Medicine, Penn State University, State College, 1850 East Park Avenue, Suite 112, State College, PA 16803, USA. Electronic address: pseidenberg@hmc.psu.edu.

Erratum in

  • Med Clin North Am. 2015 Jan;99(1):xix.

Abstract

Overuse injuries of the lateral and medial elbow are common in sport, recreational activities, and occupational endeavors. They are commonly diagnosed as lateral and medial epicondylitis; however, the pathophysiology of these disorders demonstrates a lack of inflammation. Instead, angiofibroblastic degeneration is present, referred to as tendinosis. As such, a more appropriate terminology for these conditions is epicondylosis. This is a clinical diagnosis, and further investigations are only performed to rule out other clinical entities after conventional therapy has failed. Yet, most patients respond to conservative measures with physical therapy and counterforce bracing. Corticosteroid injections are effective for short-term pain control but have not demonstrated long-term benefit.

KEYWORDS:

Elbow overuse injuries; Elbow tendinopathy; Golfer’s elbow; Lateral epicondylitis; Medial epicondylitis; Tennis elbow

PMID:
24994055
DOI:
10.1016/j.mcna.2014.04.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science
Loading ...
Support Center