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J Prosthet Dent. 2014 Dec;112(6):1425-31. doi: 10.1016/j.prosdent.2014.05.012. Epub 2014 Jul 1.

A 3-dimensional accuracy analysis of chairside CAD/CAM milling processes.

Author information

  • 1Research Assistant, Division for Computerized Restorative Dentistry, Center of Dental Medicine, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland. Electronic address: gabriel.bosch@zzm.uzh.ch.
  • 2Research Assistant, Division for Computerized Restorative Dentistry, Center of Dental Medicine, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.
  • 3Head of Division, Division for Computerized Restorative Dentistry, Center of Dental Medicine, University of Zürich, Zürich, Switzerland.

Abstract

STATEMENT OF PROBLEM:

Milling is a central and important aspect of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology. High milling accuracy reduces the time needed to adapt the workpiece and provides restorations with better longevity and esthetic appeal. The influence of different milling processes on the accuracy of milled restorations has not yet been reviewed.

PURPOSE:

The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of different milling processes on the accuracy of ceramic restorations.

MATERIAL AND METHODS:

Four groups of partial crowns were milled (each n = 17): Three groups in a 4-axial milling unit: (1) 1-step mode and Step Bur 12S (12S), (2) 1-step mode and Step Bur 12 (1Step), (3) 2-step mode and Step Bur 12 (2Step), and (4) one group in a 5-axial milling unit (5axis). The milled occlusal and inner surfaces were scanned and superimposed over the digital data sets of calculated restorations with specialized difference analysis software. The trueness of each restoration and each group was measured. One-way ANOVA with a post hoc Tukey test was used to compare the data (α = .05).

RESULTS:

The highest trueness for the inner surface was achieved in group 5axis (trueness, 41 ± 15 μm, P<.05). The 4-axial milling unit exhibited trueness at settings ranging from 61 μm (2Step) to 96 μm (12S). For the occlusal surface, the highest trueness was achieved with group 5axis (trueness, 42 ± 10 μm). The 4-axial milling unit exhibited trueness at settings ranging from 55 μm (1Step) to 76 μm (12S).

CONCLUSIONS:

Restorations milled with a 5-axial milling unit have a higher trueness than those milled with a 4-axial milling unit. A rotary cutting instrument with a smaller diameter results in a more accurate milling process. The 2-step mode is not significantly better than the 1-step mode.

PMID:
24993373
DOI:
10.1016/j.prosdent.2014.05.012
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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