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Clin Nutr. 2015 Jun;34(3):523-8. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2014.06.004. Epub 2014 Jun 17.

Anthropometric indices to assess body-fat changes during a multidisciplinary obesity treatment in adolescents: EVASYON Study.

Author information

1
GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza, C/ Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain; Department of Psychiatry and Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, C/ Domingo Miral s/n, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain; Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, C/ Domingo Miral s/n, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain.
2
GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza, C/ Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain; Department of Psychiatry and Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, C/ Domingo Miral s/n, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain. Electronic address: lmoreno@unizar.es.
3
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, Universidad de Zaragoza, Pza. Universidad 3, 22002 Huesca, Spain; Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), Ministry of Science and Innovation, Madrid, Spain.
4
Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, Ctra. Alfacar s/n, University of Granada, 18011 Granada, Spain; PROFITH (Promoting FITness and Health through physical activity) Research Group, University of Granada, Ctra. Alfacar s/n, 18011 Granada, Spain.
5
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Avda. C/ Madrid 11, University of Granada, 18012 Granada, Spain.
6
Department of Physical Education and Sport, Faculty of Sport Sciences, Ctra. Alfacar s/n, University of Granada, 18011 Granada, Spain; Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Avda. C/ Madrid 11, University of Granada, 18012 Granada, Spain.
7
Department of Food Sciences, Nutrition and Physiology, C/ Irunlarrrea 1, Universidad of Navarra, 31008 Pamplona, Navarra, Spain.
8
Department of Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Avda. C/ Madrid 11, University of Granada, 18012 Granada, Spain; EURISTIKOS Excellence Centre for Paediatric Research, Biomedical Research Centre, Health Sciences Technological Park, Ctra. Alfacar s/n, University of Granada, 18011 Granada, Spain.
9
Immunonutrition Research Group, Department of Metabolism and Nutrition, Institute of Food Science and Technology and Nutrition (ICTAN), Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), C/ José Antonio Novais, 10, 28040 Madrid, Spain.
10
GENUD (Growth, Exercise, NUtrition and Development) Research Group, Universidad de Zaragoza, C/ Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain; Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, C/ Domingo Miral s/n, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza, Spain.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

The main objectives of weight loss interventions in children and adolescents are to decrease fat mass while maintaining fat-free mass. Several methods are available to assess childhood and adolescence obesity, such as weight and height, bioelectrical impedance, skin-fold thickness measurements and other laboratory methods. The aim was to assess simple anthropometric indices as predictors of body-fat changes, using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry measurements as reference method.

METHODS:

Multi-intervention approach (diet, physical activity and psychological support in a family-group-based treatment) was implemented with a one-year follow-up in 13-to-16-year-old overweight or obese Spanish adolescents. A total of 83 adolescents were recruited from Granada and Zaragoza, males (n = 43) (31.6 kg/m(2)) and females (n = 40) (32.0 kg/m(2)). We measured body composition with anthropometry and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. All measurements were made at baseline, and after 2 and 13 months. Random coefficient regression model was used to calculate the proportion of body composition changes during follow-up that would be explained by simple body composition indices based on anthropometric measures.

RESULTS:

After controlling for age and Tanner stage, body mass index explained 76.5% of body composition changes in males and 90.1% in females, while fat mass index (assessed by skin-folds) explained 78.9% of body composition changes in males and 84.0% of body composition changes in females.

CONCLUSIONS:

In conclusion, we found that BMI was a good indicator of body fat composition changes in children and adolescents, although FMI assessed by anthropometry was also a good indicator.

KEYWORDS:

Body composition; Body mass index; Dual X-ray absorptiometry; Fat mass index; Fat mass loss programme; Multi-intervention approach

PMID:
24993080
DOI:
10.1016/j.clnu.2014.06.004
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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