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PLoS One. 2014 Jul 3;9(7):e101523. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0101523. eCollection 2014.

Distribution and diversity of planktonic fungi in the West Pacific Warm Pool.

Author information

1
Department of Microbiology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States of America.
2
Collaborative Innovation Center of Deep Sea Biology, Tianjin University Center for Marine Environmental Ecology, School of Environment & Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China.
3
State Key Laboratory of Crop Biology, College of Life Sciences, Shandong Agricultural University, Tai'an, China.
4
Collaborative Innovation Center of Deep Sea Biology, College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, China.
5
Marine Laboratory, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States of America.
6
Department of Microbiology, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States of America; Collaborative Innovation Center of Deep Sea Biology, Tianjin University Center for Marine Environmental Ecology, School of Environment & Engineering, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China; College of Engineering, California Baptist University, Riverside, California, United States of America.

Abstract

Fungi contribute substantially to biogeochemical cycles of terrestrial and marine habitats by decomposing matter and recycling nutrients. Yet, the diversity of their planktonic forms in the open ocean is poorly described. In this study, culture-independent and molecular approaches were applied to investigate fungal diversity and abundance derived from samples collected from a broad swath of the Pacific Warm Pool across major environmental gradients Our results revealed that planktonic fungi were molecularly diverse and their diversity patterns were related to major phytoplankton taxa and various nutrients including nitrate, nitrite, orthophosphate and silicic acid. Over 400 fungal phylotypes were recovered across this region and nearly half of them grouped into two major fungal lineages of Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, whose abundance varied among stations. These results suggest that planktonic fungi are a diverse and integral component of the marine microbial community and should be included in future marine microbial ecosystem models.

PMID:
24992154
PMCID:
PMC4081592
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0101523
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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