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Can J Rural Med. 2014 Summer;19(3):99-102.

Invasive CA-MRSA in northwestern Ontario: a 2-year prospective study.

Author information

1
Division of Clinical Sciences, Northern Ontario School of Medicine, Sioux Lookout, Ont.
2
Anishnaabe Bimaadiziwin Research Unit, Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre; Sioux Lookout First Nations Health Authority, Sioux Lookout, Ont.
3
Laboratory Services, Microbiology, Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre, Sioux Lookout, Ont.
4
Infection Control, Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre, Sioux Lookout, Ont.
5
Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre, Sioux Lookout, Ont.
6
Division of Infectious Diseases, Ottawa Hospital; Faculty of Medicine, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ont.

Abstract

in English, French

INTRODUCTION:

Northwestern Ontario has a documented high rate of skin and soft-tissue infections due to community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). Recently, invasive illness from this common pathogen has become a serious clinical problem in the region. We sought to better understand this trend of invasive CA-MRSA.

METHODS:

We prospectively studied cases of positive CA-MRSA bacteremia in 2012 and 2013. We examined genetic typing, comorbidities and outcomes.

RESULTS:

Twenty-three cases of CA-MRSA bacteremia were treated during the 2-year study period. Intravenous drug use accounted for only 17% of cases. One death and 2 cases of endocarditis occurred.

CONCLUSION:

High rates of CA-MRSA in skin and soft-tissue infections, combined with poor living conditions and poor access to potable water, may account for most of these cases of CA-MRSA bacteremia. Social determinants of health are relevant when common resistant bacterial isolates become associated with life-threatening illness.

PMID:
24991860
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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