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Chronic Dis Inj Can. 2014 Jul;34(2-3):145-53.

Performance of administrative case definitions for comorbidity in multiple sclerosis in Manitoba and Nova Scotia.

[Article in English, French; Abstract available in French from the publisher]

Author information

1
Department of Internal Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; Department of Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.
2
Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Department of Psychiatry, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, Canada.
3
Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, Canada.
4
Department of Medicine (Neurology), University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
5
Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montréal, Quebec, Canada; Research Institute of the McGill University Health Centre, Montréal, Quebec, Canada.
6
Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada.
7
Department of Medicine, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada; Capital District Health Authority, Halifax, Canada.

Abstract

in English, French

INTRODUCTION:

As the population ages and the prevalence of comorbid conditions increases, the need for feasible, validated methods of comorbidity surveillance in chronic diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) increases.

METHODS:

Using kappa (k) statistics, we evaluated the performance of administrative case definitions for comorbidities commonly observed in MS by comparing agreement between Manitoba (MB) administrative data and self-report (n = 606) and Nova Scotia (NS) administrative data and self-report (n = 1923).

RESULTS:

Agreement between the administrative definitions and self-report was substantial for hypertension (k = 0.69 [NS], 0.76 [MB]) and diabetes (k = 0.70 [NS], 0.66 [MB]); moderate for hyperlipidemia (k = 0.53 [NS], 0.51 [MB]) and heart disease (k = 0.42 [NS], 0.51 [MB]) and fair for anxiety (k = 0.27 [NS], 0.26 [MB]). In NS, agreement was substantial for inflammatory bowel disease (k = 0.71) and moderate for epilepsy (k = 0.48).

CONCLUSION:

Administrative definitions for commonly observed comorbidities in MS performed well in 2 distinct jurisdictions. This suggests that they could be used more broadly across Canada and in national studies.

PMID:
24991777
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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