Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Hosp Pediatr. 2014 Jul;4(4):195-202. doi: 10.1542/hpeds.2014-0003.

Prioritizing a research agenda: a Delphi study of the better outcomes through research for newborns (BORN) network.

Author information

1
University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Medicine, Children's Mercy Hospital Kansas City, Missouri easimpson@cmh.edu.
2
Division of Neonatology and Division of Hospital Medicine, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, Ohio.
3
Academic Pediatric Association, McLean, Virginia.
4
University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, California.
5
Nemours and Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
6
Holy Cross Health, Silver Spring, Maryland.
7
Well Newborn Care, Kaiser Permanente, Downey, California.
8
Department of Pediatrics, University of Washington, Seattle, and Newborn Nursery, University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, Washington.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

There is a paucity of evidence to guide clinical management for term and late preterm newborns. The Better Outcomes through Research for Newborns (BORN) network is a national collaborative of clinicians formed to increase the evidence-base for well newborn care.

OBJECTIVE:

To develop a consensus-based, prioritized research agenda for well newborn care.

DESIGN:

A two-round modified Delphi survey of BORN members was conducted. Round 1 was an open-ended survey soliciting 5 clinical questions identified as important and under-researched. Using qualitative methods, 20 most common themes were extracted and transformed into research questions. Round 2 survey respondents ranked the top 20 questions using a 5- point Likert scale and a quantitative analysis was conducted.

RESULTS:

Round 1 survey generated 439 unique research questions that fell into 57 themes. In the Round 2 survey, the highest rated questions were: 1) At what weight-loss percentage is it medically necessary to formula supplement a breastfeeding infant? 2) What is the optimal management of infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome? 3) How and when should we initiate a workup for sepsis, and how should these newborns be managed?

CONCLUSIONS:

Research priorities of clinicians include criteria for medically indicated formula supplementation of the breastfed newborn, management of neonatal abstinence syndrome and management of newborns at-risk for sepsis.

KEYWORDS:

Delphi technique; academic medical centers; infant; newborn; nursery

PMID:
24986986
DOI:
10.1542/hpeds.2014-0003
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free full text
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire
    Loading ...
    Support Center