Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Nutrition. 2014 Jul-Aug;30(7-8):794-9. doi: 10.1016/j.nut.2013.12.006. Epub 2013 Dec 14.

Dietary protein intake and change in estimated GFR in the Cardiovascular Health Study.

Author information

1
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA. Electronic address: jeannette.beasley@einstein.yu.edu.
2
Collaborative Health Studies Coordinating Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
3
Department of Medicine, UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco, California, USA.
4
Division of Nephrology University of California-San Diego, San Diego, California, USA.
5
School of Public Health, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, USA.
6
Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

With aging, kidney function declines, as evidenced by reduced glomerular filtration rate. It is controversial whether or not high protein intake accelerates this decline. The aim of this study was to determine whether high protein intake was associated with declines in kidney function among older patients.

METHODS:

We examined whether dietary protein is associated with change in kidney function (mean follow-up 6.4 y [SD = 1.4, range = 2.5-7.9] in the Cardiovascular Health Study (N = 3623). We estimated protein intake using a food frequency questionnaire and estimated glomerular filtration rate from cystatin C. Associations between protein intake and kidney function were determined by linear and logistic regression models.

RESULTS:

Average protein intake was 19% of energy intake (SD = 5%). Twenty-seven percent (n = 963) of study participants had rapid decline in kidney function, as defined by (ΔeGFRcysC > 3 mL•min•1.73 m(2)). Protein intake (characterized as g/d and % energy/d), was not associated with change in estimated glomerular filtration rate (P > 0.05 for all comparisons). There were also no significant associations when protein intake was separated by source (animal and vegetable).

CONCLUSION:

These data suggest that higher protein intake does not have a major effect on kidney function decline among elderly men and women.

KEYWORDS:

Animal protein; Glomerular filtration rate; Kidney; Macronutrients; Vegetable protein

PMID:
24984995
PMCID:
PMC4082792
DOI:
10.1016/j.nut.2013.12.006
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Publication type, MeSH terms, Substance, Grant support

Publication type

MeSH terms

Substance

Grant support

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center