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Nat Commun. 2014 Jul 1;5:4320. doi: 10.1038/ncomms5320.

Offspring production with sperm grown in vitro from cryopreserved testis tissues.

Author information

1
Department of Urology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama 236-0004, Japan.
2
Laboratory of Proteomics, Institute of Molecular Medicine and Life Science, Yokohama City University Association of Medical Science, Yokohama 236-0004, Japan.
3
Department of Maternal-Fetal Biology, National Research Institute for Child Health and Development, Tokyo 157-8535, Japan.
4
RIKEN, Bioresource Center, Ibaraki 305-0074, Japan.
5
1] Department of Urology, Yokohama City University Graduate School of Medicine, Yokohama 236-0004, Japan [2] Laboratory of Proteomics, Institute of Molecular Medicine and Life Science, Yokohama City University Association of Medical Science, Yokohama 236-0004, Japan.

Abstract

With the increasing cure rate of paediatric cancers, infertility, as one of the adverse effects of treatments, has become an important concern for patients and their families. Since semen cryopreservation is applicable only for post-pubertal patients, alternative pre-pubertal measures are necessary. Here we demonstrate that testis tissue cryopreservation is a realistic measure for preserving the fertility of an individual. Testis tissues of neonatal mice were cryopreserved either by slow freezing or by vitrification. After thawing, they were cultured on agarose gel and showed spermatogenesis up to sperm formation. Microinsemination was performed with round spermatids and sperm, leading to eight offspring in total. They grew healthily and produced progeny upon natural mating between them. This strategy, the cryopreservation of testis tissues followed by in vitro spermatogenesis, is promising to preserve the fertility of male paediatric cancer patients in the future.

PMID:
24984101
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms5320
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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