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Br J Cancer. 2014 Aug 26;111(5):828-36. doi: 10.1038/bjc.2014.350. Epub 2014 Jul 1.

Validation and utilisation of high-coverage next-generation sequencing to deliver the pharmacological audit trail.

Author information

1
1] Cancer Biomarkers Team, The Institute of Cancer Research, 15 Cotswold Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5NG, UK [2] Drug Development Unit, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT, UK.
2
Cancer Biomarkers Team, The Institute of Cancer Research, 15 Cotswold Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5NG, UK.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Predictive biomarker development is a key challenge for novel cancer therapeutics. We explored the feasibility of next-generation sequencing (NGS) to validate exploratory genomic biomarkers that impact phase I trial selection.

METHODS:

We prospectively enrolled 158 patients with advanced solid tumours referred for phase I clinical trials at the Royal Marsden Hospital (October 2012 to March 2013). After fresh and/or archived tumour tissue were obtained, 93 patients remained candidates for phase I trials. Results from tumour sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq were cross-validated in 27 out of 93 patients on the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (IT-PGM) blinded to results. MiSeq validation with Sequenom MassARRAY OncoCarta 1.0 (Sequenom Inc., San Diego, CA, USA) was performed in a separate cohort.

RESULTS:

We found 97% concordance of mutation calls by MiSeq and IT-PGM at a variant allele frequency ⩾13% and ⩾500 × depth coverage, and 91% concordance between MiSeq and Sequenom. Common 'actionable' mutations involved deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) repair (51%), RAS-RAF-MEK (35%), Wnt (26%), and PI3K-AKT-mTOR (24%) signalling. Out of 53, 29 (55%) patients participating in phase I trials were recommended based on identified actionable mutations.

CONCLUSIONS:

Targeted high-coverage NGS panels are a highly feasible single-centre technology well-suited to cross-platform validation, enrichment of trials with molecularly defined populations and hypothesis testing early in drug development.

PMID:
24983367
PMCID:
PMC4150267
DOI:
10.1038/bjc.2014.350
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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