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Isr Med Assoc J. 2014 May;16(5):299-302.

Effect of seasonality, weather and holidays on the incidence of proximal hip fracture.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Proximal hip fractures in the elderly are common and place a heavy burden on health resources. Researching the timing of these fractures could contribute to diverting resources towards peaks in incidence and investing in prevention at certain times.

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the effect of seasonality, weather and Jewish holidays on hip fracture incidence in older adults. The study population comprised 2050 patients aged 65 years or more who sustained a proximal hip fracture.

METHODS:

The computerized files of the patients were reviewed for trends in incidence by season, precipitation, minimum and maximum temperatures, day of the week, and certain Jewish festivals.

RESULTS:

Hip fractures were more likely to occur in the winter than in the summer (P < 0.0001). Factors that significantly correlated with hip fracture were the maximum daily temperature (r = -0.746, P = 0.005) followed by the minimum daily temperature (r = -0.740, P = 0.006) and precipitation (r = 0.329, P = 0.02). There were fewer fractures on Saturdays (the Sabbath) as compared to other days of the week (P = 0.045). Researching the incidence on Jewish holidays, we found an elevated incidence on Passover (P < 0.0001) and a reduced incidence on the Day of Atonement (Yom Kippui) (P = 0.013).

CONCLUSIONS:

In older people there is an elevated incidence of proximal hip fractures during the winter and on the Jewish festivals. On weekends and on the Day of Atonement the incidence of proximal hip fractures was reduced.

PMID:
24979835
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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