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World J Gastroenterol. 2014 Jun 28;20(24):7878-86. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v20.i24.7878.

Emerging roles of lactic acid bacteria in protection against colorectal cancer.

Author information

1
Li Zhong, Xufei Zhang, Mihai Covasa, Department of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA 91766, United States.

Abstract

Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide and the fourth most common cancer diagnosed among men and women in the United States. Considering the risk factors of CRC, dietary therapy has become one of the most effective approaches in reducing CRC morbidity and mortality. The use of probiotics is increasing in popularity for both the prevention and treatment of a variety of diseases. As the most common types of microbes used as probiotics, lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are comprised of an ecologically diverse group of microorganisms united by formation of lactic acid as the primary metabolite of sugar metabolism. LAB have been successfully used in managing diarrhea, food allergies, and inflammatory bowel disease. LAB also demonstrated a host of properties in preventing colorectal cancer development by inhibiting initiation or progression through multiple pathways. In this review, we discuss recent insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms of LAB in CRC prevention including apoptosis, antioxidant DNA damages, immune responses, and epigenetics. The emerging experimental findings from clinical trials as well as the proposed mechanisms of gut microbiota in carcinogenesis will also be briefly discussed.

KEYWORDS:

Carcinogenesis; Gastrointestinal; Gut bacteria; Microbiota; Probiotics

PMID:
24976724
PMCID:
PMC4069315
DOI:
10.3748/wjg.v20.i24.7878
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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