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Biosens Bioelectron. 2014 Dec 15;62:52-8. doi: 10.1016/j.bios.2014.06.008. Epub 2014 Jun 11.

Functionalized graphene as sensitive electrochemical label in target-dependent linkage of split aptasensor for dual detection.

Author information

1
Laboratory of Chemical Biology, Division of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022, China; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, China.
2
Laboratory of Chemical Biology, Division of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022, China.
3
Laboratory of Chemical Biology, Division of Biological Inorganic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Resource Utilization, Changchun Institute of Applied Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun, Jilin 130022, China. Electronic address: xqu@ciac.ac.cn.

Abstract

A new type of electrochemical aptasensor was reported here for highly sensitive detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activity using functionalized graphene as efficient electrochemical label. The specific binding of ATP and its aptamer could link the split aptamers modified graphene and magnetic beads together. After ADA catalysis and magnetic separation, graphene material anchored on electrode surface would efficiently facilitate electron transfer, thus produce detectable electrochemical signals. The detection limits for ATP and ADA activity were 13.6 nM and 0.01 unit/mL (~1.2 nM), respectively. Our work would supply new horizons for the diagnostic applications of graphene-based materials in biomedicine and biosensors.

KEYWORDS:

ATP; adensine deaminase activity; dual detection; graphene; split aptamer

PMID:
24976151
DOI:
10.1016/j.bios.2014.06.008
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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