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Child Adolesc Psychiatr Clin N Am. 2014 Jul;23(3):555-90. doi: 10.1016/j.chc.2014.02.002. Epub 2014 May 27.

Omega-3 fatty acid and nutrient deficits in adverse neurodevelopment and childhood behaviors.

Author information

1
Section of Nutritional Neurosciences, Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, 31 Center Drive, Building 31, Room 1B54, Rockville, MD 20892, USA.
2
Section of Nutritional Neurosciences, Laboratory of Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics, National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health, 5625 Fishers Lane, Room 3N-01, Rockville, MD 20892, USA. Electronic address: jhibbeln@mail.nih.gov.

Abstract

Nutritional insufficiencies of omega-3 highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFAs) may have adverse effects on brain development and neurodevelopmental outcomes. A recent meta-analysis reported a small to modest effect size for the efficacy of omega-3 in youth. Several controlled trials of omega-3 HUFAs combined with micronutrients show sizable reductions in aggressive, antisocial, and violent behavior in youth and young adult prisoners. Studies of HUFAs in youth, however, remain lacking. As the evidence base for omega-3 HUFAs as potential psychiatric treatment develops, dietary adjustments to increase omega-3 and reduce omega-6 HUFA consumption are sensible recommendations based on general health considerations.

KEYWORDS:

Arachidonic acid; Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; Child neurodevelopment; Conduct disorder; Docosahexaenoic acid; Eicosapentaenoic acid; Learning disorders; Omega-3 fatty acids

PMID:
24975625
PMCID:
PMC4175558
DOI:
10.1016/j.chc.2014.02.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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