Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Clin Nutr. 2015 Jun;34(3):508-14. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2014.06.002. Epub 2014 Jun 16.

Dietary indexes, food patterns and incidence of metabolic syndrome in a Mediterranean cohort: The SUN project.

Author information

1
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; Department of Maternal and Child Nursing and Public Health, School of Nursing, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Brazil. Electronic address: adrianomp@ufmg.br.
2
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain; CIBER Fisiopatología de la Obesidad y Nutrición (CIBERobn), Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain.
3
Human Physiology Unit, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.
4
Department of Preventive Medicine and Public Health, School of Medicine, University of Navarra, Pamplona, Spain.
5
Cancer Prevention and Control Program, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA; Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Arnold School of Public Health, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

We prospectively assessed the association between adherence to several a priori defined healthy food patterns and risk of metabolic syndrome (MetS).

METHODS:

We assessed 6851 participants of a Spanish dynamic prospective cohort of university graduates, initially free of any MetS-specific definition criteria, and followed-up for a median of 8.3 years. We calculated the adherence to thirteen different a priori defined food patterns or dietary indexes. MetS was classified according to the updated harmonizing criteria. We estimated multivariable-adjusted Incidence Rate Ratios (IRR) of metabolic syndrome and their 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI), using Poisson regression models.

RESULTS:

The cumulative incidence of MetS was 5.0%. Moderate adherence to the Pro-Vegetarian Diet (PVEG) was significantly associated with a lower risk for developing MetS (IRR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.59-0.97). Among women, an inverse association with the PVEG was significant not only for a moderate adherence (IRR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.36-0.82), but also for higher adherence (IRR = 0.63, 95% CI = 0.43-0.93). A higher adherence to the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet showed an inverse association with the MetS among participants, but only if they had low alcohol intake (RR = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.20-0.85).

CONCLUSIONS:

Our findings support the adoption of a PVEG dietary pattern for the reduction of MetS risk. The same statement can be applied in relation to the DASH diet, insofar a limited consumption of alcoholic beverages is also maintained.

KEYWORDS:

Alcohol drinking; Cohort studies; Diet, vegetarian; Metabolic syndrome X; Sodium restricted; Spain

PMID:
24975512
PMCID:
PMC4870043
DOI:
10.1016/j.clnu.2014.06.002
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Elsevier Science Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center