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Vet Microbiol. 2014 Aug 27;172(3-4):505-10. doi: 10.1016/j.vetmic.2014.05.033. Epub 2014 Jun 7.

Experimental infection of cats with Afipia felis and various Bartonella species or subspecies.

Author information

1
Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA. Electronic address: bbchomel@ucdavis.edu.
2
Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA.
3
Intracellular Pathogens Research Laboratory, Center for Comparative Medicine and Translational Research, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27607, USA.
4
Napa County Public Health Division, 2344 Old Sonoma Road, Napa, CA 94559, USA.
5
Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of California at San Francisco, San Francisco, CA 94143-0654, USA.
6
Graduate Institute of Microbiology and Public Health, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan.

Abstract

Based upon prior studies, domestic cats have been shown to be the natural reservoir for Bartonella henselae, Bartonella clarridgeiae and Bartonella koehlerae. However, other Bartonella species, such as Bartonella vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii, Bartonella quintana or Bartonella bovis (ex weissii) have been either isolated from or Bartonella DNA sequences PCR amplified and sequenced. In the late 1980s, before B. henselae was confirmed as the etiological agent of cat scratch disease, Afipia felis had been proposed as the causative agent. In order to determine the feline susceptibility to A. felis, B. vinsonii subsp. berkhoffii, Bartonella rochalimae, B. quintana or B. bovis, we sought to detect the presence of bacteremia and seroconversion in experimentally-inoculated cats. Most of the cats seroconverted, but only the cats inoculated with B. rochalimae became bacteremic, indicating that cats are not natural hosts of A. felis or the other Bartonella species or subspecies tested in this study.

KEYWORDS:

Afipia felis; Bartonella; Cats; Experimental infection; Zoonosis

PMID:
24972870
DOI:
10.1016/j.vetmic.2014.05.033
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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