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Elife. 2014 Jun 27;3. doi: 10.7554/eLife.02851.

Global distribution maps of the leishmaniases.

Author information

1
Spatial Ecology and Epidemiology Group, Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.
2
Laboratoire de Parasitologie-Mycologie, UFR Médecine, Université Montpellier 1 and UMR 'MiVEGEC', CNRS 5290/IRD 224, Montpellier, France.
3
Department of Pediatrics, Harvard Medical School, Boston, United States.
4
Children's Hospital Informatics Program, Boston Children's Hospital, Boston, United States.
5
Fogarty International Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, United States.
6
Global Health Group, RTI International, Washington DC, United States.

Abstract

The leishmaniases are vector-borne diseases that have a broad global distribution throughout much of the Americas, Africa, and Asia. Despite representing a significant public health burden, our understanding of the global distribution of the leishmaniases remains vague, reliant upon expert opinion and limited to poor spatial resolution. A global assessment of the consensus of evidence for leishmaniasis was performed at a sub-national level by aggregating information from a variety of sources. A database of records of cutaneous and visceral leishmaniasis occurrence was compiled from published literature, online reports, strain archives, and GenBank accessions. These, with a suite of biologically relevant environmental covariates, were used in a boosted regression tree modelling framework to generate global environmental risk maps for the leishmaniases. These high-resolution evidence-based maps can help direct future surveillance activities, identify areas to target for disease control and inform future burden estimation efforts.

KEYWORDS:

boosted regression trees; cutaneous leishmaniasis; epidemiology; global health; human; infectious disease; leishmania; microbiology; niche based modelling; species distribution modelling; visceral leishmaniasis

PMID:
24972829
PMCID:
PMC4103681
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.02851
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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