Format

Send to

Choose Destination
Eur J Public Health. 2015 Apr;25(2):320-4. doi: 10.1093/eurpub/cku088. Epub 2014 Jun 27.

Breast cancer diagnosis and death in the Netherlands: a changing burden.

Author information

1
1 Department for Health Evidence, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands Danielle.vanderWaal@radboudumc.nl.
2
1 Department for Health Evidence, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
3
2 National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, Nijmegen, The Netherlands 3 Department of Radiology, Academic Medical Centre, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
4
4 Department of Medical Oncology, GROW-School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
5
1 Department for Health Evidence, Radboud university medical center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands 2 National Expert and Training Centre for Breast Cancer Screening, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Lifetime risks are often used in communications on cancer to the general public. The most-cited estimate for breast cancer risk (1 in 8 women), however, appears to be outdated. Here we describe the breast cancer burden in the Netherlands over time by means of lifetime and age-conditional risks. The aim is to identify changes in absolute risk of primary breast cancer diagnosis and death.

METHODS:

Data on breast cancer incidence, mortality and size of the female population were retrieved from the Netherlands Cancer Registry and Statistics Netherlands. Lifetime and age-conditional risks were calculated for 1990, 2000 and 2010 using the life-table method (DevCan software).

RESULTS:

The lifetime risk of developing breast cancer (ductal carcinoma in situ and invasive) in 1990, 2000 and 2010 was estimated at 10.8 (1 in 9.3 women), 13.5 (1 in 7.4) and 15.2% (1 in 6.6), respectively. Most women were still diagnosed after the age of 50, with the highest risk between 60 and 70 years in 2010. The lifetime risk of breast cancer death was 3.8% (1 in 27) in 2010, which is lower than in 1990 (4.5%; 1 in 22) and 2000 (4.2%; 1 in 24).

CONCLUSION:

Breast cancer risk has increased to 1 in 6.6 women being diagnosed during their lifetime (invasive cancer only: 1 in 7.4), whereas risk of breast cancer death has decreased from 1 in 22 to 1 in 27 women. To keep cancer management and prevention up-to-date, it remains important to closely monitor the ever-changing breast cancer burden.

PMID:
24972595
DOI:
10.1093/eurpub/cku088
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
Loading ...
Support Center