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Brain Stimul. 2014 Sep-Oct;7(5):690-3. doi: 10.1016/j.brs.2014.05.005. Epub 2014 May 24.

Case report: stimulation of the right amygdala induces transient changes in affective bias.

Author information

1
Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, USA. Electronic address: kelly-rowe@uiowa.edu.
2
Department of Neurosurgery, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, USA.
3
Department of Psychiatry, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, USA.
4
Department of Neurology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, USA; Laureate Institute for Brain Research, USA.
5
Department of Neurology, University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Sensitive outcome measures are needed to quantify the effects of neuromodulation in mood disorders.

OBJECTIVE:

This study examined the utility of a novel affective bias (AB) task in identifying transient mood changes induced by amygdala stimulation in a single rare participant.

METHODS:

Localized, pulsed electrical stimulation was delivered for 8 min during measures of AB and self-reported mood. Responses were compared with those gathered without stimulation on the same day in the same setting, using paired t-tests.

RESULTS:

Stimulation of the basolateral nucleus of the right amygdala at 50 Hz, 15 V, and 200 μs pulse-width produced a significant positive shift in AB (t = -2.864, df = 53, P = .006), despite equivocal findings on self-reported mood (t = -.184, df = 12, P = .857).

CONCLUSION:

Affective bias may be more sensitive to stimulation-induced fluctuations in mood than subjective report, suggesting utility as an outcome measure in neuromodulation studies.

KEYWORDS:

Bioassay; Deep brain stimulation; Depression; Emotion; Mood

PMID:
24972588
PMCID:
PMC4167906
DOI:
10.1016/j.brs.2014.05.005
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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