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Curr Opin Neurobiol. 2014 Dec;29:82-7. doi: 10.1016/j.conb.2014.05.010. Epub 2014 Jun 24.

Functional neuromodulation of chemosensation in vertebrates.

Author information

1
Computational Physiology Lab, Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, Mudd Hall W249, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853, USA. Electronic address: CL243@cornell.edu.
2
Dept. of Neurobiology and Behavior, Graduate Program in Neuroscience, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, NY 11794, USA. Electronic address: alfredo.fontanini@stonybrook.edu.

Abstract

Neuromodulation can be defined as a biophysical process that serves to modify-or modulate-the computation performed by a neuron or network as a function of task demands and behavioral state of the animal. These modulatory effects often involve substances extrinsic to the network under observation, such as acetylcholine (ACh), norepinephrine (NE), histamine, serotonin (5-HT), dopamine (DA), and a variety of neuropeptides. Olfactory and gustatory processes especially need to be adaptive and respond flexibly to changing environments, availability of resources and physiological needs. It is therefore crucial to understand the neuromodulatory processes that regulate the function of these systems.

PMID:
24971592
PMCID:
PMC4268319
DOI:
10.1016/j.conb.2014.05.010
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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