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J Obes. 2014;2014:824310. doi: 10.1155/2014/824310. Epub 2014 May 26.

Lifestyle interventions targeting body weight changes during the menopause transition: a systematic review.

Author information

1
Faculty of Graduate Studies, Institute of Population Health, University of Ottawa, 1 Stewart Street, Room 300, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 6N5.
2
School of Nursing, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, Room RGN 1118, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8M5 ; Centre for Practice Changing Research, Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Box 201B, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6.
3
Centre for Practice Changing Research, Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, 501 Smyth Road, Box 201B, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8L6.
4
School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, 125 University Private, MNT 366, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 6N5.
5
Département de Nutrition, Université de Montréal et CRCHUM, 2405 Côte Ste-Catherine, Pavillon Liliane-de-Stewart, Montréal, QC, Canada H3T 1A1.
6
Health Sciences Library, University of Ottawa, 451 Smyth Road, RGN Health Sciences Library, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1H 8M5.
7
Prevention and Rehabilitation Division, University of Ottawa Heart Institute, 40 Ruskin Street, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1Y 4W7.
8
School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, 125 University Private, MNT 366, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1N 6N5 ; Institut de Recherche de l'Hôpital Montfort, 745 Building A, Suite 202, Montreal Road, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1K 0T1.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine the effectiveness of exercise and/or nutrition interventions and to address body weight changes during the menopause transition.

METHODS:

A systematic review of the literature was conducted using electronic databases, grey literature, and hand searching. Two independent researchers screened for studies using experimental designs to evaluate the impact of exercise and/or nutrition interventions on body weight and/or central weight gain performed during the menopausal transition. Studies were quality appraised using Cochrane risk of bias. Included studies were analyzed descriptively.

RESULTS:

Of 3,564 unique citations screened, 3 studies were eligible (2 randomized controlled trials, and 1 pre/post study). Study quality ranged from low to high risk of bias. One randomized controlled trial with lower risk of bias concluded that participation in an exercise program combined with dietary interventions might mitigate body adiposity increases, which is normally observed during the menopause transition. The other two studies with higher risk of bias suggested that exercise might attenuate weight loss or weight gain and change abdominal adiposity patterns.

CONCLUSIONS:

High quality studies evaluating the effectiveness of interventions targeting body weight changes in women during their menopause transition are needed. Evidence from one higher quality study indicates an effective multifaceted intervention for women to minimize changes in body adiposity.

PMID:
24971172
PMCID:
PMC4058255
DOI:
10.1155/2014/824310
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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