Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Cancer Res. 2014 Sep 1;74(17):4694-705. doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-13-3725. Epub 2014 Jun 26.

A search for novel cancer/testis antigens in lung cancer identifies VCX/Y genes, expanding the repertoire of potential immunotherapeutic targets.

Author information

1
Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. ataguchi@mdanderson.org.
2
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington.
3
Department of Translational Molecular Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.
4
Department of Clinical Cancer Prevention, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.
5
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Center for Systems Biology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas.
6
Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas. Department of Pharmacology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas.
7
Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas.
8
Department of Integrative Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Research Centre, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
9
Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas. Department of Pharmacology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas. Department of Internal Medicine, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas.
10
Hamon Center for Therapeutic Oncology Research, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas. Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas.

Abstract

Cancer/testis (CT) antigens are potential immunotherapeutic targets in cancer. However, the expression of particular antigens is limited to a subset of tumors of a given type. Thus, there is a need to identify antigens with complementary expression patterns for effective therapeutic intervention. In this study, we searched for genes that were distinctly expressed at a higher level in lung tumor tissue and the testes compared with other nontumor tissues and identified members of the VCX/Y gene family as novel CT antigens. VCX3A, a member of the VCX/Y gene family, was expressed at the protein level in approximately 20% of lung adenocarcinomas and 35% of squamous cell carcinomas, but not expressed in normal lung tissues. Among CT antigens with concordant mRNA and protein expression levels, four CT antigens, XAGE1, VCX, IL13RA2, and SYCE1, were expressed, alone or in combination, in about 80% of lung adenocarcinoma tumors. The CT antigen VCX/Y gene family broadens the spectrum of CT antigens expressed in lung adenocarcinomas for clinical applications.

PMID:
24970476
PMCID:
PMC4398029
DOI:
10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-13-3725
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center