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Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol. 2014 Dec;123(12):840-6. doi: 10.1177/0003489414538936. Epub 2014 Jun 26.

Oncologic efficacy of angiolytic KTP laser treatment of early glottic cancer.

Author information

1
Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School; Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA zeitels.steven@mgh.harvard.edu.
2
Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School; Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Angiolytic laser removal of early glottic cancer with ultra-narrow margins was reported in a pilot study 5 years ago as an innovative surgical treatment strategy to better preserve vocal function. Subsequently, in a cohort of > 90 patients, enhanced voice outcomes were achieved and there was diminished need for post-treatment phonosurgical reconstruction. However, the initial pilot study examining oncologic efficacy had a limited number of patients and most did not have 3-year follow-up. Consequently, further analysis of the oncologic efficacy is valuable.

METHOD:

Retrospective review.

RESULTS:

One hundred seventeen patients (T1a-71, T1b-11, T2a-10, T2b-25) underwent potassium-titanyl-phosphate (KTP) laser treatment of early glottic cancer with a minimum 3-year follow-up (average = 53 months). The "b" designation delineated bilateral disease. Disease control for T1 and T2 lesions was 96% (79/82) and 80% (28/35), respectively. All 10 recurrences were treated with radiotherapy. Fifty percent (5/10) were controlled with radiotherapy, and the other 5 died of disease. Larynx preservation and survival were achieved in 99% (81/82) with T1 disease and 89% (31/35) with T2 disease.

CONCLUSION:

This investigation provides further evidence that angiolytic KTP laser removal of early glottic cancer with ultra-narrow margins is an effective oncologic treatment strategy. Radiotherapy was preserved for future use in more than 90% of patients. Since a majority of patients are referred by an otolaryngologist to undergo treatment of early glottic cancer with radiotherapy, this investigation provides compelling information to reappraise this paradigm.

KEYWORDS:

KTP laser; glottic cancer; phonomicrosurgery; vocal cord cancer; vocal fold cancer; voice preservation; voice surgery

PMID:
24970297
DOI:
10.1177/0003489414538936
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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