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Pers Soc Psychol Rev. 2014 Nov;18(4):366-86. doi: 10.1177/1088868314535988. Epub 2014 Jun 26.

Reconsidering the link between impulsivity and suicidal behavior.

Author information

1
University of Southern Mississippi, Hattiesburg, USA michael.anestis@usm.edu.
2
Military Suicide Research Consortium, Denver, CO, USA Denver VA Medical Center MIRECC, CO, USA.
3
Military Suicide Research Consortium, Denver, CO, USA Denver VA Medical Center MIRECC, CO, USA University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
4
University of Colorado, Boulder, USA.
5
Military Suicide Research Consortium, Denver, CO, USA Florida State University, Tallahassee, USA.

Abstract

It is widely accepted that suicidal behavior often occurs with little planning. We propose, however, that suicidal behavior is rarely if ever impulsive-that it is too frightening and physically distressing to engage in without forethought-and that suicidal behavior in impulsive individuals is accounted for by painful and fearsome behaviors capable of enhancing their capacity for suicide. We conducted a meta-analysis of the association between trait impulsivity and suicidal behavior and a critical review of research considering the impulsiveness of specific suicide attempts. Meta-analytic results suggest the relationship between trait impulsivity and suicidal behavior is small. Furthermore, studies examining a mediating role of painful and provocative behaviors have uniformly supported our model. Results from our review suggest that researchers have been unable to adequately measure impulsivity of attempts and that measures sensitive to episodic planning must be developed to further our understanding of this phenomenon.

KEYWORDS:

acquired capability; impulsivity; suicide

PMID:
24969696
DOI:
10.1177/1088868314535988
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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