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Neuroimage. 2014 Oct 15;100:507-19. doi: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2014.06.039. Epub 2014 Jun 24.

A shift from prospective to reactive modulation of beta-band oscillations in Parkinson's disease.

Author information

1
Radboud University Medical Centre, Dept. of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
2
Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
3
Radboud University Medical Centre, Dept. of Neurology, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands; Donders Institute for Brain, Cognition and Behaviour, Radboud University Nijmegen, Nijmegen, The Netherlands. Electronic address: peter.praamstra@radboudumc.nl.

Abstract

Increased beta (13-30 Hz) oscillatory synchrony in basal ganglia-cortical circuits is a physiological characteristic of Parkinson's disease (PD). While the function of the beta rhythm is unknown, there is evidence that its modulation serves a predictive role, in preparation of future actions. We investigate the relation between predictive beta modulation and entrainment of brain oscillations in a task inviting behavioral entrainment by a regular task structure. MEG was recorded during a serial choice response task, in a group of 12 PD patients and 12 control subjects. In one condition, the reaction stimuli allowed for temporal preparation only (random condition), while in a second condition (predictable condition) the reaction stimuli allowed both temporal and effector preparation. Reaction times were identical between groups, and both groups benefited equally from the known effector side in the predictable condition. Analysis of oscillatory activity, by contrast, revealed marked differences between groups. In patients, the proportion of preparatory beta power desynchronization preceding the reaction stimuli was significantly smaller than in controls, while the proportion of beta desynchronization following the events was larger. In addition to this shift from prospective to reactive modulation of beta-band oscillations, patients showed a trend to reduced motor cortical pre-stimulus delta phase synchronization, and later gamma power synchronization than controls. Delta phase synchronization was, furthermore, significantly correlated with predictive beta desynchronization, supporting the relevance of hierarchical coupling between oscillations of different frequencies for the analysis of oscillatory changes in PD. Together, these features of task-related oscillatory activity indicate that entrainment fails to engender the same predictive mode of motor activation in PD patients as in healthy controls.

KEYWORDS:

Basal ganglia; Entrainment; MEG; Neural oscillations; Parkinson's disease

[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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