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Clin Nutr. 2015 Jun;34(3):501-7. doi: 10.1016/j.clnu.2014.06.001. Epub 2014 Jun 11.

Inulin-type fructans modulate intestinal Bifidobacterium species populations and decrease fecal short-chain fatty acids in obese women.

Author information

1
Metabolism and Nutrition Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.
2
Laboratory of Food and Environmental Microbiology, Earth and Life Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium.
3
Laboratory of Microbiology, Wageningen University, Wageningen, The Netherlands; Department of Bacteriology & Immunology, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland.
4
Pole of Endocrinology, Diabetology and Nutrition, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium.
5
Department of Microbiology and Biochemistry of Dairy Products, Instituto de Productos Lácteos de Asturias, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (IPLA-CSIC), Villaviciosa, Asturias, Spain.
6
Metabolism and Nutrition Research Group, Louvain Drug Research Institute, Université Catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium. Electronic address: nathalie.delzenne@uclouvain.be.

Abstract

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Inulin-type fructans (ITF) prebiotics promote changes in the composition and activity of the gut microbiota. The aim of this study was to determine variations on fecal short chain fatty acids (SCFA) concentration in obese women treated with ITF and to explore associations between Bifidobacterium species, SCFA and host biological markers of metabolism.

METHODS:

Samples were obtained in a randomized, double blind, parallel, placebo-controlled trial, with 30 obese women randomly assigned to groups that received either 16 g/day ITF (n = 15) or maltodextrin (n = 15) for 3 months. The qualitative and quantitative analysis of Bifidobacterium spp. was performed in feces by PCR-DGGE and q-PCR, and SCFA profile was analyzed by gas chromatography. Spearman correlation analysis was performed between the different variables analyzed.

RESULTS:

The species Bifidobacterium longum, Bifidobacterium pseudocatenulatum and Bifidobacterium adolescentis were significantly increased at the end of the treatment in the prebiotic group (p < 0.01) with being B. longum negatively correlated with serum lipopolysaccharide (LPS) endotoxin (p < 0.01). Total SCFA, acetate and propionate, that positively correlated with BMI, fasting insulinemia and homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) (p < 0.05), were significantly lower in prebiotic than in placebo group after the treatment period.

CONCLUSIONS:

ITF consumption selectively modulates Bifidobacterium spp. and decreases fecal SCFA concentration in obese women. ITF could lessen metabolic risk factors associated with higher fecal SCFA concentration in obese individuals.

TRIAL REGISTRATION:

ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00616057.

KEYWORDS:

Bifidobacterium; Gut microbiota; ITF; Obesity; SCFA

PMID:
24969566
DOI:
10.1016/j.clnu.2014.06.001
[Indexed for MEDLINE]

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