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Bioresour Technol. 2014 Sep;167:14-23. doi: 10.1016/j.biortech.2014.04.086. Epub 2014 May 10.

Sugar-rich sweet sorghum is distinctively affected by wall polymer features for biomass digestibility and ethanol fermentation in bagasse.

Author information

1
National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China; Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China; College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China.
2
National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China; Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China; College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China.
3
Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100093, China.
4
Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China.
5
National Key Laboratory of Crop Genetic Improvement, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China; Biomass and Bioenergy Research Centre, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China; College of Plant Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China; College of Life Science and Technology, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070, China. Electronic address: lpeng@mail.hzau.edu.cn.

Abstract

Sweet sorghum has been regarded as a typical species for rich soluble-sugar and high lignocellulose residues, but their effects on biomass digestibility remain unclear. In this study, we examined total 63 representative sweet sorghum accessions that displayed a varied sugar level at stalk and diverse cell wall composition at bagasse. Correlative analysis showed that both soluble-sugar and dry-bagasse could not significantly affect lignocellulose saccharification under chemical pretreatments. Comparative analyses of five typical pairs of samples indicated that DP of crystalline cellulose and arabinose substitution degree of non-KOH-extractable hemicelluloses distinctively affected lignocellulose crystallinity for high biomass digestibility. By comparison, lignin could not alter lignocellulose crystallinity, but the KOH-extractable G-monomer predominately determined lignin negative impacts on biomass digestions, and the G-levels released from pretreatments significantly inhibited yeast fermentation. The results also suggested potential genetic approaches for enhancing soluble-sugar level and lignocellulose digestibility and reducing ethanol conversion inhibition in sweet sorghum.

KEYWORDS:

Biomass digestibility; Dry bagasse; Plant cell walls; Soluble sugar; Sweet sorghum

PMID:
24968107
DOI:
10.1016/j.biortech.2014.04.086
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
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