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Biomed Res Int. 2014;2014:610591. doi: 10.1155/2014/610591. Epub 2014 May 20.

Effect of engaging trainees by assessing peer performance: a randomised controlled trial using simulated patient scenarios.

Author information

  • 1Centre for Clinical Education (CEKU), University of Copenhagen and Capital Region of Denmark, Rigshospitalet, Teilumbygningen, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • 2Department of Anesthesia and The Wilson Centre, 200 Elizabeth Street, 1ES-565, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 2C4.
  • 3Department of Anaesthesiology, Centre of Head and Orthopaedics, Rigshospitalet and Copenhagen University, Blegdamsvej 9, 2100 Copenhagen, Denmark.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:

The aim of this study was to explore the learning effect of engaging trainees by assessing peer performance during simulation-based training.

METHODS:

Eighty-four final year medical students participated in the study. The intervention involved trainees assessing peer performance during training. Outcome measures were in-training performance and performance, both of which were measured two weeks after the course. Trainees' performances were videotaped and assessed by two expert raters using a checklist that included a global rating. Trainees' satisfaction with the training was also evaluated.

RESULTS:

The intervention group obtained a significantly higher overall in-training performance score than the control group: mean checklist score 20.87 (SD 2.51) versus 19.14 (SD 2.65) P = 0.003 and mean global rating 3.25 SD (0.99) versus 2.95 (SD 1.09) P = 0.014. Postcourse performance did not show any significant difference between the two groups. Trainees who assessed peer performance were more satisfied with the training than those who did not: mean 6.36 (SD 1.00) versus 5.74 (SD 1.33) P = 0.025.

CONCLUSION:

Engaging trainees in the assessment of peer performance had an immediate effect on in-training performance, but not on the learning outcome measured two weeks later. Trainees had a positive attitude towards the training format.

PMID:
24967383
PMCID:
PMC4054978
DOI:
10.1155/2014/610591
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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