Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Front Neuroeng. 2014 Jun 11;7:17. doi: 10.3389/fneng.2014.00017. eCollection 2014.

Nanocrystalline diamond surfaces for adhesion and growth of primary neurons, conflicting results and rational explanation.

Author information

1
Department of Neurobiology, The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Science, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Jerusalem, Israel.
2
Institute for Materials Research in MicroElectronics - Interuniversity Micro Electronics Centre, Hasselt University Antwerp, Belgium.
3
Department of Neurobiology, The Alexander Silberman Institute of Life Science, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Jerusalem, Israel ; The Harvy M. Kruger Family Center for Nanoscience, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem Jerusalem, Israel.

Erratum in

  • Front Neuroeng. 2014;7:37. McDonald, Mathew [corrected to McDonald, Matthew].

Abstract

Using a variety of proliferating cell types, it was shown that the surface of nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) provides a permissive substrate for cell adhesion and development without the need of complex chemical functionalization prior to cell seeding. In an extensive series of experiments we found that, unlike proliferating cells, post-mitotic primary neurons do not adhere to bare NCD surfaces when cultured in defined medium. These observations raise questions on the potential use of bare NCD as an interfacing layer for neuronal devices. Nevertheless, we also found that classical chemical functionalization methods render the "hostile" bare NCD surfaces with adhesive properties that match those of classically functionalized substrates used extensively in biomedical research and applications. Based on the results, we propose a mechanism that accounts for the conflicting results; which on one hand claim that un-functionalized NCD provides a permissive substrate for cell adhesion and growth, while other reports demonstrate the opposite.

KEYWORDS:

calcium imaging; cell adhesion; cultured neurons; nanocrystalline diamonds; network connectivity; poly-d-lysine

PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Frontiers Media SA Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center