Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Vet Intern Med. 2014 Sep-Oct;28(5):1546-50. doi: 10.1111/jvim.12392. Epub 2014 Jun 25.

Use of the cortisol-to-ACTH ratio for diagnosis of primary hypoadrenocorticism in dogs.

Author information

1
Department of Clinical Sciences, Mississippi State University of Veterinary Medicine, Mississippi State, Mississippi.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The ACTH stimulation test is currently required for definitive diagnosis of hypoadrenocorticism. Increased cost of synthetic ACTH (cosyntropin) has prompted a search for alternative diagnostic methods.

OBJECTIVE:

The purpose of this study was to determine whether a cortisol-to-ACTH ratio (CAR) can be used to differentiate dogs with hypoadrenocorticism from normal dogs and those with nonadrenal illness.

ANIMALS:

Eight healthy dogs (H), 19 dogs with nonadrenal illness (NAI), and 15 dogs with hypoadrenocorticism (HAD).

METHODS:

Dogs in the HAD group were retrospectively identified from PUVTH medical records. The NAI group consisted of hospitalized dogs with clinical signs, clinicopathologic findings, or both, consistent with a diagnosis of hypoadrenocorticism, but in which hypoadrenocorticism was ruled out based on ACTH stimulation test results. Healthy dogs were recruited from hospital staff and students. Endogenous ACTH concentrations and cortisol concentrations before and after ACTH stimulation were measured in all dogs.

RESULTS:

Baseline cortisol concentration was significantly lower, and ACTH concentration was significantly higher, in the HAD group versus the H and NAI group (P < .001). However, there was overlap among groups. Cortisol-to-ACTH ratio was significantly lower in the HAD group versus the H and NAI groups (P < .001), and there was no overlap between the HAD group and the other 2 groups.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE:

CAR can be used for definitive diagnosis of primary hypoadrenocorticism.

KEYWORDS:

Addison's; Adrenocorticotropic; Canine; Cosyntropin; Hormone

PMID:
24966067
PMCID:
PMC4895572
DOI:
10.1111/jvim.12392
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Wiley Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center