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Am J Physiol Cell Physiol. 2014 Nov 1;307(9):C814-40. doi: 10.1152/ajpcell.00050.2014. Epub 2014 Jun 25.

Evidence from simultaneous intracellular- and surface-pH transients that carbonic anhydrase IV enhances CO2 fluxes across Xenopus oocyte plasma membranes.

Author information

1
Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio; Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; and Department of Physiology and Biophysics, University of Sao Paulo, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Sao Paulo, Brazil raifaziz@icb.usp.br.
2
Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio;
3
Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio; Department of Medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio; Department of Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut; and.

Abstract

Human carbonic anhydrase IV (CA IV) is GPI-anchored to the outer membrane surface, catalyzing CO2/HCO3 (-) hydration-dehydration. We examined effects of heterologously expressed CA IV on intracellular-pH (pHi) and surface-pH (pHS) transients caused by exposing oocytes to CO2/HCO3 (-)/pH 7.50. CO2 influx causes a sustained pHi fall and a transient pHS rise; CO2 efflux does the opposite. Both during CO2 addition and removal, CA IV increases magnitudes of maximal rate of pHi change (dpHi/dt)max, and maximal pHS change (ΔpHS) and decreases time constants for pHi changes (τpHi ) and pHS relaxations (τpHS ). Decreases in time constants indicate that CA IV enhances CO2 fluxes. Extracellular acetazolamide blocks all CA IV effects, but not those of injected CA II. Injected acetazolamide partially reduces CA IV effects. Thus, extracellular CA is required for, and the equivalent of cytosol-accessible CA augments, the effects of CA IV. Increasing the concentration of the extracellular non-CO2/HCO3 (-) buffer (i.e., HEPES), in the presence of extracellular CA or at high [CO2], accelerates CO2 influx. Simultaneous measurements with two pHS electrodes, one on the oocyte meridian perpendicular to the axis of flow and one downstream from the direction of extracellular-solution flow, reveal that the downstream electrode has a larger (i.e., slower) τpHS , indicating [CO2] asymmetry over the oocyte surface. A reaction-diffusion mathematical model (third paper in series) accounts for the above general features, and supports the conclusion that extracellular CA, which replenishes entering CO2 or consumes exiting CO2 at the extracellular surface, enhances the gradient driving CO2 influx across the cell membrane.

KEYWORDS:

HEPES; acetazolamide; electrophysiology; ion-sensitive microelectrodes; mathematical modeling

PMID:
24965590
PMCID:
PMC4216941
DOI:
10.1152/ajpcell.00050.2014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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