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Sci Rep. 2014 Jun 26;4:5448. doi: 10.1038/srep05448.

Scaling of nitrogen and phosphorus across plant organs in shrubland biomes across Northern China.

Author information

1
Department of Ecology, College of Urban and Environmental Sciences and Key Laboratory for Earth Surface Processes, Peking University, Beijing, China.
2
College of Life Science, Inner Mongolia University, Hohhot, China.
3
Xinjiang Institute of Ecology and Geography, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi, China.
4
College of Agriculture, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang, China.
5
College of Forestry, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, China.
6
Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing, China.
7
College of Life Science, Northwest University, Xi'an, China.

Abstract

Allocation of limiting resources, such as nutrients, is an important adaptation strategy for plants. Plants may allocate different nutrients within a specific organ or the same nutrient among different organs. In this study, we investigated the allocation strategies of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in leaves, stems and roots of 126 shrub species from 172 shrubland communities in Northern China using scaling analyses. Results showed that N and P have different scaling relationships among plant organs. The scaling relationships of N concentration across different plant organs tended to be allometric between leaves and non-leaf organs, and isometric between non-leaf organs. Whilst the scaling relationships of P concentration tended to be allometric between roots and non-root organs, and isometric between non-root organs. In arid environments, plant tend to have higher nutrient concentration in leaves at given root or stem nutrient concentration. Evolutionary history affected the scaling relationships of N concentration slightly, but not affected those of P concentration. Despite fairly consistent nutrients allocation strategies existed in independently evolving lineages, evolutionary history and environments still led to variations on these strategies.

PMID:
24965183
PMCID:
PMC4071319
DOI:
10.1038/srep05448
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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