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PLoS One. 2014 Jun 25;9(6):e100914. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0100914. eCollection 2014.

Associations of physical activity, screen time with depression, anxiety and sleep quality among Chinese college freshmen.

Author information

1
School of Public Health, Wuhan University, Wuhan, P. R. China.
2
School of Public Health, Wuhan University, Wuhan, P. R. China; Global Health Institute, Wuhan University, Wuhan, P. R. China.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the independent and interactive associations of physical activity (PA) and screen time (ST) with depression, anxiety and sleep quality among Chinese college students.

METHODS:

A cross-sectional study was conducted in Wuhan University, China from November to December 2011. The students reported their PA, ST and socio-economic characteristics using self-administered questionnaires. Sleep quality was measured by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Depression and anxiety were assessed using the Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) and Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), respectively. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of the independent and interactive relationships of PA and ST with depression, anxiety and sleep quality.

RESULTS:

A total of 1106 freshmen (471 females and 635 males) aged 18.9±0.9 years were included in the study. After adjustment for potential confounders, high PA and low ST were independently associated with significantly lower risks for poor sleep quality (OR: 0.48, 95% CI: 0.30-0.78) and depression (OR: 0.67, 95%CI: 0.44-0.89), respectively. An interactive inverse association was observed for combined effects of PA and low ST on depression (OR: 0.62, 95%CI: 0.40-0.92) and sleep quality (OR: 0.51, 95%CI: 0.27-0.91). No statistically significant associations were found between PA, ST and anxiety among the participants.

CONCLUSIONS:

These findings suggest an independent and interactive relationship of high PA and low ST with significantly reduced prevalence of depressive problems and favorable sleep quality among Chinese college freshmen.

PMID:
24964250
PMCID:
PMC4071010
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0100914
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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