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Eur J Neurosci. 2014 Sep;40(6):2910-21. doi: 10.1111/ejn.12662. Epub 2014 Jun 25.

Influence of monkey dorsolateral prefrontal and posterior parietal activity on behavioral choice during attention tasks.

Author information

1
Department of Neurobiology & Anatomy, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, NC, 27157-1010, USA.

Abstract

The dorsolateral prefrontal and the posterior parietal cortex have both been implicated in the guidance of visual attention. Traditionally, posterior parietal cortex has been thought to guide visual bottom-up attention and prefrontal cortex to bias attention through top-down information. More recent studies suggest a parallel time course of activation of the two areas in bottom-up attention tasks, suggesting a common involvement, though these results do not necessarily imply identical roles. To address the specific roles of the two areas, we examined the influence of neuronal activity recorded from the prefrontal and parietal cortex of monkeys as they performed attention tasks based on choice probability and on correlation between reaction time and neuronal activity. The results revealed that posterior parietal but not dorsolateral prefrontal activity correlated with behavioral choice during the fixation period, prior to the appearance of the stimulus, resembling a bias factor. This preferential influence of posterior parietal activity on behavior was transient, so that dorsolateral prefrontal activity predicted choice after the appearance of the stimulus. Additionally, reaction time was better predicted by posterior parietal activity. These findings confirm the involvement of both dorsolateral prefrontal and posterior parietal cortex in the bottom-up guidance of visual attention, but indicate different roles of the two areas in the guidance of attention and a dynamic time course of their effects, influencing behavior at different stages of the task.

KEYWORDS:

intraparietal sulcus; monkey; neurophysiology; principal sulcus

PMID:
24964224
PMCID:
PMC4172489
DOI:
10.1111/ejn.12662
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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