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Nat Commun. 2014 Jun 25;5:4248. doi: 10.1038/ncomms5248.

Adaptive introgression between Anopheles sibling species eliminates a major genomic island but not reproductive isolation.

Author information

1
1] Department of Vector Biology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool L3 5QA, UK [2].
2
1] Department of Vector Biology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool L3 5QA, UK [2] Cape Coast Department of Entomology and Wildlife, School of Biological Science, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana.
3
1] Cape Coast Department of Entomology and Wildlife, School of Biological Science, University of Cape Coast, Cape Coast, Ghana [2] Biotechnology and Nuclear Agriculture Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, PO Box LG 80, Legon, Accra, Ghana.
4
Malaria Programme, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1RQ, UK.
5
Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA.
6
18a Church Lane, Hornsey, London N8 7BU, UK.
7
Department of Vector Biology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool L3 5QA, UK.
8
1] Malaria Programme, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1RQ, UK [2] Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX3 7BN, UK.
9
1] Department of Vector Biology, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Pembroke Place, Liverpool L3 5QA, UK [2] Malaria Programme, Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1RQ, UK.

Abstract

Adaptive introgression can provide novel genetic variation to fuel rapid evolutionary responses, though it may be counterbalanced by potential for detrimental disruption of the recipient genomic background. We examine the extent and impact of recent introgression of a strongly selected insecticide-resistance mutation (Vgsc-1014F) located within one of two exceptionally large genomic islands of divergence separating the Anopheles gambiae species pair. Here we show that transfer of the Vgsc mutation results in homogenization of the entire genomic island region (~1.5% of the genome) between species. Despite this massive disruption, introgression is clearly adaptive with a dramatic rise in frequency of Vgsc-1014F and no discernable impact on subsequent reproductive isolation between species. Our results show (1) how resilience of genomes to massive introgression can permit rapid adaptive response to anthropogenic selection and (2) that even extreme prominence of genomic islands of divergence can be an unreliable indicator of importance in speciation.

PMID:
24963649
PMCID:
PMC4086683
DOI:
10.1038/ncomms5248
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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