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Elife. 2014 Jun 24;3:e02630. doi: 10.7554/eLife.02630.

Genome rearrangements and pervasive meiotic drive cause hybrid infertility in fission yeast.

Author information

1
Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, United States.
2
Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, United States University of Washington, Seattle, United States.
3
Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, United States Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, United States hsmalik@fhcrc.org.

Abstract

Hybrid sterility is one of the earliest postzygotic isolating mechanisms to evolve between two recently diverged species. Here we identify causes underlying hybrid infertility of two recently diverged fission yeast species Schizosaccharomyces pombe and S. kambucha, which mate to form viable hybrid diploids that efficiently complete meiosis, but generate few viable gametes. We find that chromosomal rearrangements and related recombination defects are major but not sole causes of hybrid infertility. At least three distinct meiotic drive alleles, one on each S. kambucha chromosome, independently contribute to hybrid infertility by causing nonrandom spore death. Two of these driving loci are linked by a chromosomal translocation and thus constitute a novel type of paired meiotic drive complex. Our study reveals how quickly multiple barriers to fertility can arise. In addition, it provides further support for models in which genetic conflicts, such as those caused by meiotic drive alleles, can drive speciation.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02630.001.

KEYWORDS:

chromosomal rearrangements; meiotic drive; recombination; speciation

Comment in

PMID:
24963140
PMCID:
PMC4066438
DOI:
10.7554/eLife.02630
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

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