Format

Send to

Choose Destination
J Int Neuropsychol Soc. 2014 Jul;20(6):611-9. doi: 10.1017/S1355617714000460. Epub 2014 Jun 24.

Measuring episodic memory across the lifespan: NIH Toolbox Picture Sequence Memory Test.

Author information

1
1Department of Rehabilitation Medicine,University of Washington,Seattle,Washington.
2
2Department of Psychology,Emory University,Atlanta,Georgia.
3
3Cognitive Neurology and Alzheimer's Disease Center,Northwestern Feinberg School of Medicine,Chicago,Illinois.
4
4Department of Neurology,University of California,Davis,California.
5
5Department of Medical Social Sciences,Northwestern University,Chicago,Illinois.
6
6Departments of Neurological Surgery and Biostatistics,University of Washington,Seattle,Washington.
7
7Department of Psychiatry,University of California,San Diego,California.

Abstract

Episodic memory is one of the most important cognitive domains that involves acquiring, storing and recalling new information. In this article, we describe a new measure developed for the NIH Toolbox, called the Picture Sequence Memory Test (PSMT) that is the first to examine episodic memory across the age range from 3 to 85. We describe the development of the measure and present validation data for ages 20 to 85. The PSMT involves presentation of sequences of pictured objects and activities in a fixed order on a computer screen and simultaneously verbally described, that the participant must remember and then reproduce over three learning trials. The results indicate good test-retest reliability and construct validity. Performance is strongly related to well-established "gold standard" measures of episodic memory and, as expected, much less well correlated with those of a measure of vocabulary. It shows clear decline with aging in parallel with a gold standard summary measure and relates to several other demographic factors and to self-reported general health status. The PSMT appears to be a reliable and valid test of episodic memory for adults, a finding similar to those found for the same measure with children.

PMID:
24960230
PMCID:
PMC4254833
DOI:
10.1017/S1355617714000460
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article

Supplemental Content

Full text links

Icon for Cambridge University Press Icon for PubMed Central
Loading ...
Support Center