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PLoS One. 2014 Jun 24;9(6):e100965. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0100965. eCollection 2014.

Examination of daytime sleepiness and cognitive performance testing in patients with primary insomnia.

Author information

1
Sleep Medicine Center, Mental Health Center, Translational Neuroscience Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China; Department of Internal Medicine, First People's Hospital of Yibin, Yibin, Sichuan Province, China.
2
Sleep Medicine Center, Mental Health Center, Translational Neuroscience Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China; Department of Neurosurgery, First People's Hospital of Yibin, Yibin, Sichuan Province, China.
3
Sleep Medicine Center, Mental Health Center, Translational Neuroscience Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China.
4
Department of Psychology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

While individuals with insomnia consistently complain of cognitive impairment, previous studies on the effect of insomnia on objective measures of cognitive function have obtained ambiguous results. The relationship between daytime sleepiness and cognitive manifestations in insomnia patients is not clear.

METHODS:

Thirty-six primary insomnia patients (PIPs) and 26 good sleep controls (GSCs) with age and gender matched manner were included in the study. Participants underwent an overnight polysomnography followed by a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) and an examination of the attention network test (ANT). ANT reflected three attentional networks including alerting, orienting and executive control. According to whether accompanied with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), the insomnia group were subdivided into PIPs with EDS (n = 12, score on MSLT<10 min) and PIPs without EDS (n = 24, score on MSLT≥10 min).

RESULTS:

PIPs only performed worse on executive control function than GSCs in ANT. PIPs with EDS had longer overall reaction time (RT) related to PIPs without EDS. Further analyses with Pearson correlation analysis showed a significant negative correlation between the overall RT and MSLT latency in insomniacs (r = -0.444, p<0.01), whereas no such correlation was found in controls.

CONCLUSIONS:

Results suggest that PIPs do show executive control function deficits compared with GSCs. Daytime sleepiness in terms of MSLT latency was associated with poor cognitive manifestations in patients with insomnia.

PMID:
24959897
PMCID:
PMC4069181
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0100965
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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