Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Pediatrics. 2014 Jul;134(1):e72-9. doi: 10.1542/peds.2013-3229.

Caregiver-mediated intervention for low-resourced preschoolers with autism: an RCT.

Author information

1
Human Development & Psychology,Center for Autism Research & Treatment, and ckasari@mednet.ucla.edu.
2
The Ohio State University Nisonger Center, andThe Ohio State University Special Education Department, Columbus, Ohio;
3
Biostatistics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California;
4
Department of Human Development and Quantitative Methodology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland;
5
Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, Maryland;
6
Weill Cornell Medical Center, New York, New York;
7
Children's Hospital of Seattle, Seattle, Washington; and.
8
Department of Clinical Sciences, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida.

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To compare 2 short-term, community caregiver training interventions for preschool-aged children with Autism Spectrum Disorder who had low resources. Low resource was defined by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development low-income index or 1 "indicator," (e.g., Medicaid eligibility). Child outcomes focused on joint engagement, joint attention, and play.

METHODS:

Participants included 112 families of a child who had Autism Spectrum Disorder who met criteria for being low-resourced and who were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 3-month interventions, group caregiver education or individualized caregiver-mediated intervention (CMM). Children were assessed for social communication skills pre- and post-treatment, and followed up at 3 months.

RESULTS:

All children improved in joint engagement and initiating joint attention, with significantly greater improvement by the CMM group. Outcomes on play skills were mixed, with improvement of symbolic play for the CMM group and no change in functional play skills. Joint engagement maintained over time for the CMM group, and initiating joint attention maintained for both groups over time.

CONCLUSIONS:

This study is among the first randomized trials comparing 2 active interventions with a large sample of low-resourced families. Results suggest improvements in core autism deficits of joint engagement, joint attention, and symbolic play with relatively brief, caregiver-mediated interventions, but additional support is necessary to maintain and generalize these gains over time.

KEYWORDS:

autism; early intervention; joint attention; parent-child interactions

PMID:
24958585
PMCID:
PMC4531276
DOI:
10.1542/peds.2013-3229
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Support Center