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Drug Discov Today. 2014 Aug;19(8):1270-6. doi: 10.1016/j.drudis.2014.06.014. Epub 2014 Jun 20.

Targeting the Wnt signaling pathways in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

Author information

1
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive Grant S140B, Stanford, CA 94305, USA. Electronic address: vdejesus@stanford.edu.
2
Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive Grant S140B, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.
3
Children's Hospital Helsinki, Tukholmankatu 8, FI-00290 Helsinki, Finland; Biomedicum Helsinski, Tukholmankatu 8, FI-00290 Helsinki, Finland Finland.
4
Pediatric Cardiology, Stanford University Medical Center, 300 Pasteur Drive Grant S140B, Stanford, CA 94305, USA.

Abstract

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a life-threatening disorder that is associated with elevated pulmonary pressures and right heart failure resulting from progressive loss and thickening of small pulmonary arteries. Despite their ability to improve symptoms, current therapies fail to prevent disease progression, leaving lung transplantation as the only therapy in end-stage PAH. To overcome the limitations of current therapies, there is an active search for disease-modifying agents capable of altering the natural history of, and improving clinical outcomes in, PAH. The Wnt signaling pathways have emerged as attractive treatment targets in PAH given their role in the preservation of pulmonary vascular homeostasis and the recent development of Wnt-specific compounds and biological therapies capable of modulating pathway activity. In this review, we summarize the literature describing the role of Wnt signaling in the pulmonary circulation and discuss promising advances in the field of Wnt therapeutics that could lead to novel clinical therapies capable of preventing and/or reversing pulmonary vascular pathology in patients with this devastating disease.

PMID:
24955837
PMCID:
PMC4689294
DOI:
10.1016/j.drudis.2014.06.014
[Indexed for MEDLINE]
Free PMC Article
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